The developers of WordPress have just announced the (one month earlier than scheduled!) release of WordPress 2.6. There’s a fair few new features, with the major one being change-tracking – enabling you to view previous versions of pages and posts, and also compare the differences.

There’s been various other improvements too, including a real-time word-count, image captions and more.

As I’ve come to expect these days, the upgrade from 2.5 went very smoothly.

PorgyI’ve updated The Wight One to be Widget capable, – surprisingly easy thing to do. The main reason for doing it was so that I could make use of the ReadySetFlickr plugin in order to display images from my Flickr account. Once I’m happy that the theme’s working (and when I’ve finally added the CSS for comments) I’ll package it up nicely and make it available for download.

After having tweaked the layout and CSS a little more, Porgy (on the right) no longer breaks things.

As you might have noticed the site’s now sporting a new theme. It’s not quite complete yet, but the main design is pretty much sorted. I’m calling it ‘The Wight One’, for fairly self-explanatory reasons. A number of the tweaks and features are inspired by Matt Mullenweg’s new site but I’m not anywhere near as stylish as Nicolò Volpato (the designer of his new theme).

I’ve also taken the opportunity to upgrade to the latest version of WordPress, 2.5.1 which apparently fixes a number of minor issues, and a couple of security vulnerabilities from the original 2.5 release.

Things I’ve yet to include in the design:

  1. Photo gallery handling (I’ve got a design roughed out in HTML, but it’s not been converted to WordPress templates yet)
  2. Comment styles
  3. An alternative theme for mobile devices (which will be handy for my Nokia N95)
  4. Probably a bunch of other stuff, but I’ll discover that later

The header image is a view of the cliffs toward the Needles on the Isle of Wight, and is from ThisParticularGreg‘s Flickr collection. The image at the foot of the theme is a view along Tennyson Down, and is from klbw‘s Flickr stream. Both are used under Creative Commons licences.